Social Media in Education Isn’t a Fad, It’s a Revolution | InstructureCon 2013

Social Media in Education Isn’t a Fad, It’s a Revolution | InstructureCon 2013


[APPLAUSE] JOSH MURDOCK: Thank you. So I wanted to talk to you today
about social media, and about how, as educators, we need
to embrace social media. And I’m going to talk to you
a plan on how to help your faculty learn to embrace
social media also. So that’s a big accomplishment
over the last couple of years, right? Social media has changed. Social media is not
a fad, but a revolution of what’s happening. So as I talk about this, I want
to make sure that you’re following along with
the robot. And he says, “Tweet now.” So
do what the robot says. @professorjosh is my Twitter. And don’t forget the
hashtag, #instcon. So I wanted to start
out with zombies. I’ve told everyone I would
include zombies in this presentation. And it’s important because when
you think about it, a couple years ago, zombies and
Facebook had the same thing on brains that people
thought, right? They eat away your brain, that’s
what people thought. Educators thought that
Facebook was useless. Social media was useless. Why would people use this? And this is just a
few years ago. And it’s changed greatly because
people realize it’s changing the way we network,
changing the way we connect, changing the way we learn
and share information. So these are some of the
reasons why when you’re thinking about social media, how
do I engage my students? How do I communicate
with my students? How do I utilize a new tool, to
teach them a new tool they can use in the real world? How do I make my students learn
about digital literacy and understand social
media for good? So these are some of the things
that I’ll kind of cover, and these are why faculty
want to learn about social media and how to use
it in their classroom. So I’m going to start off with
learning a little bit about social media through cupcakes. So who doesn’t love
cupcakes, right? Everyone here loves cupcakes. I think I had like six
mini ones last night. I think I’ll have to go hiking
later, definitely. So this is a quick way of just
thinking about social media via cupcakes. So it’s a kind of cute way
to engage faculty. I did this as a way to
understand social media, and also understand the picture
of social media and how broad it really is. So it really involves a lot
of different things. It’s not just Facebook
and Twitter. There’s so many other things
that are part of that social networking, social
media atmosphere. So before social media,
it was the Wild West. Before we started doing training
for social media– before you do training on
a new technology, it becomes the Wild West. Faculty are saying, yes,
I want to try this. I’ll try it anyways. I’m going to experiment
with this. I’m going to try something
new, innovative. And it becomes– there’s
no guidance. There’s no best practices. And sometimes there’s
no innovation. If you don’t encourage
it and say, yes, you’re able to do it. Or, help a dean understand,
yes, social media’s OK. It’s not something that’s
threatening getting information out, because we want
to teach them how to use social media properly. And that’s a big
point of this. When I talk about this, you’ll
really understand that we wanted to go from the Wild
West of everyone doing whatever they wanted to, to kind
understanding some best practices, some guidance, how
to go through this process. So here’s kind of a general
timeline of how it all got started. And when you see this timeline,
you’re looking at how education just starts to
warm up to social media. That was maybe three or four
years ago, just [INAUDIBLE] start to warm up and
gets going on it. And then, at that time, I
started doing a lot of presentations on social media. I was very popular
at conferences. I’ll talk about millennial
generations. I’ll talk about other
things going on. But social media
then explodes. Facebook explodes. Twitter explodes. Google+ comes out. Instagram comes out, all
these new networks. People realized there’s
a change in the way we communicate. And things are happening. And then, what happens
after that? We talk about course design,
development, and the faculty demand for this. And that’s really where
this started from. People were asking for it. A lot of time at end evaluations
for faculty development courses,
we ask, what do you want to learn about? What new thing do you
want to come in? What do you want us
to teach you? What can we put on our schedule
for next year? And social media kept coming
up as a topic, so it definitely was something they
wanted to know about. So it all started with
me experimenting. I don’t know, that’s how most
innovation really happens– trying something out. Trying something new
and different. And it started out with
my Technology for Educators course. I teach that. And I was like, well, once they
leave me, these people will be future K-12 teachers. They still need to know about
technology, because it’s always changing. But they leave me and
they don’t have access to my course. They don’t have access
to my information. They would have to contact
me or email me. So I decided to start a blog,
professorjosh.com. So I started the blog to kind of
just share my information, share my information with
other educators. I’m all about that, getting
new information out there, getting different things. And then, I decided, well,
Facebook would be cool. Let’s start a page. Another way– everyone’s
on Facebook. All my students are
on Facebook. They can follow along. They don’t have to
be my friend. They can like my page and
get some information. And then, Twitter came. And how many people are
on Twitter in here? A good number. That’s great. Everyone that started using
Twitter, before you started using it, did you think it was
the stupidest idea ever? I did. I thought it was stupid. Why do I want 140 characters,
broadcast information out? But then you learn by using it,
and that’s what I teach a lot of them. You don’t learn how to use
something until you start playing with it and really
getting into it, understanding how it works and how it
can really help you. And we talk a lot about
that in the different classes we go through. So research came about. And really, probably about two
years ago, you start seeing real research happening. You’ll see a lot of different
talks in education about people actually doing research
on, did using Twitter benefit their students? Did using Facebook benefit
their students? Those kind of things. There wasn’t that three
or four years ago. There wasn’t research. People weren’t doing it. People were doing social
media, small groups and pockets at different colleges,
but there wasn’t real research out there. Also, one of our professors,
Amanda Kern at Valencia College, decided to do her
tenure research actually on social media. And some of the things they’re
looking at is both faculty, student, and industry. So that’s important to think
about, is how important is social media to industry also,
when your students go out and have to get real jobs? 51% of the faculty claim they
use social media in some way to engage students. And that’s a high number of
people probably claiming. And it could be they
had a Twitter feed. They posted something on it. They had a Facebook page. They had a Facebook group,
something like that. They could have used YouTube,
too, because YouTube’s social media. So they could have been posting
things on that. So you think of that
percentage. But this is amazing, 87% of the
industry people actually admitted to learning more
about a candidate online before hiring them. And I teach a course right now,
I just taught it last semester, called Social
Networking for Job Search. A brand new course we started
just this year. And the great thing about
it is this is true. This is the first thing I tell
them, is people are looking for you online. Now, you could have really
great stuff out there. You could have nothing out
there, or you could find really bad stuff about
yourself out there. I always tell them, how
many people have Googled their self? You have to Google yourself
and see what’s out there. If you have a really common
name, you might not find that much. But if you don’t have a common
name, you will be surprised at all the things you
find out there. So like I said, I started doing
lots of presentations about social media and
talking about it. Millennial generation, how to
connect with your Millennials. How to communicate and
engage students. Talked a lot about this at
NISOD and Sloan C and all these other conferences that
talked about online learning and new things happening. And it really started to– I could see it coming. We need to develop a
course for this. We need to develop something for
our faculty, not just do a one-time presentation
for people. Somehow, they could learn a
little more and kind of talk amongst themselves also. So I don’t know how this got in
here, but you might want to tweet at this time. So if you’re not tweeting, make
sure you’re doing that or the robots might get mad. So I wanted to really talk about
teaching and learning with social media part
one and two. We decided to split this up. We started with just developing
part one. And this came as, really,
approval from both faculty development and our learning
technologies. We decided to work together to
develop a course that would help faculty. So my side, as me, as the local
social media expert, I was the person that people
knew I was using a lot of social media personally and in
class, and things like that. I was involved with
a lot of people. I talked with a lot of other
educators about it through Twitter and other networks. So they were like, well,
we need you on there. But we also want a
non-expert, too. So think about that. It’s a great thing to bring
those people in because they look at it a different
perspective. Because you’re so used to
knowing so much about it, you bring someone in from the
outside that doesn’t know very much, or maybe is kind of
like, ugh, social media. I’m not a big user of it. I don’t like it that much. They bring a lot to
that course, too. Help you develop it, things
you forget, or things– oh, you need to be
aware of this. Or, this is why I’m
afraid of that. This is what we need to kind
of address in the course. So another part of this– and I’ll talk about it later–
it’s also bringing your legal counsel into it. Get them excited about
this, depending on what you talk about. And really, we needed to develop
a timeline for this as part of our course
review process. So that’s something
to think about. Make that timeline work with the
different people that you need to bring together, and
develop this course as a partnership with other people. So we got it approved. We got that stamp for approval,
and we decided that it would be about six
hours, PD hours. We would make it
totally online. And this is very accessible
because we have a lot of adjuncts. We have about 65,000 students. So you can just imagine how many
instructors we have, and how many of those are adjuncts
that might just teach a night class, that might teach a day
class, that might teach at different times or a faculty– it’s really hard to get a lot of
people in, like let’s go to this one campus at this one
time type of thing. You will get a lot
better response rate doing this online. So we developed about a two-week
course, extended a little bit longer
than two weeks. It was based on two-week
modules, but we extend it a little more at the beginning and
a little more at the end because we learned that people
had time rushing through certain parts. So we wanted to kind of extend
it a little bit and give them a little more time to
think about things. We developed these
four modules. And I developed them
all in SoftChalk. And the reason why I developed
them in SoftChalk, the great thing is I could export it
to any kind of learning management system. I could have it on its own. But also, it was really easy
to build and build in, actually, questions
along the way. I could kind of build-in like
self-check kind of things along the way as you’re reading
through, going through the modules, watching videos,
learning about the different things. It was really easy for me to
do that, and it was really easy to update. And I’ll talk a lot
about that. So I built these
three sections. We’ll go through each
of these, these four different modules. We’ll talk about what social
media is all about, social media tools, and legal and
ethical best practices, and integration of social media. This course is part of
our digital professor certification. So we have a certificate that
you have to go through certain mandated courses, and then you
have certain optional courses. We have certain optional that
kind of go more pedagogy pieces and certain optional
that our technical. And you have to do one of each
in those categories other than the required ones. So actually, part one and part
two, interesting enough, falls in each of those. Part one falls in the pedagogy
piece, because it’s more about that. And part two is more about
digging into the tools. So the first section we talked
about why social media isn’t a fad. We really go through social
media revolution, show them videos, talk about the
millennial generation, talk about the change in ways people
communicate, things that are done online, way people
are networking and communicating together. We also look at who the
Millennial generation is. How do we engage them? A lot of our students
are the millennial generation at Valenica. So how do we engage those
students on their turf? And each section uses
discussions along the way. So this first one was more about
introducing why you’re taking this course, what
do you think about it? But also, one of the things is,
what kind of social media do you use, and how
do you use it? Do you use it personally? Do you use it in your
class already? And it was a great way for me,
as an instructor of this course, to gauge how
the class was, too. What kind of class did I have? What kind of students? And it was always a range. Some people already used and
were just interested in learning more, and figuring out
better ways to use it and best practices. Other people kind pf were on the
fence about social media and didn’t want to use it. So it was really interesting
to see how that worked. So this is the tools we
talk about in 101. One thing is you’ll notice
the “wet paint” sign. And that’s because social media
101 always changes, because the tools always change
or something new with Facebook, something new with
Facebook groups, something new with Twitter, some new way of
using it, something new out there about it. But these are the main tools
we talked about. And I wanted to really engage a
small group of kind of core things and not go too broad into
it in all the different tools that are out there. But we talked about Facebook,
Twitter, YouTube, Flickr, WordPress, Delicious, Google+,
LinkedIn, and Slideshare. And the main reason I talked
about these is because even though there’s other things,
like Blogger and that for word, I just want to kind of
concentrate on giving them one idea of these tools that
are available to them. And if they ask, there’s other
things out there that are dealing with blogging tools. There’s other things out there
that are photo-sharing apps and things like that. So really, the basis of
it is not learning the details of the tool. I didn’t want them to learn
every in and out. That’s part two. I wanted them to learn about the
overview of the tool and get an idea of how they could
possibly use it, how other educators are already using
it, and things like that. So we go over a summary of it. We show examples. We link to any guides
that are out there. So if they did want to learn
to it, they could start digging in by themselves
a little deeper. And any kind of video and presentations that are involved. So this one we talked about
really getting them– now, pick two tools. And how would you use them, and
what do you now need to learn to be able to use them? So it’s kind of like,
now I’ve figured out what I wanted to use. Now I can explore and actually
go into these. So this really got them
started thinking. This is the major thinking
process of what I might do for that final project I was talking
about at the end. So the next part is probably
the most critical part, and this is your legal and
ethical issues. And I definitely would say get
your legal counsel involved. First off, they probably like to
get involved because a lot of people don’t have policies
on social media out there. We don’t really have one. And that’s just a choice. They say a lot of the student
code of conduct, a lot of policies we already have
at the college cover these type of things. So we talked with our
legal counsel. They came in and actually
reviewed this section with us and they gave some ideas of
other things we need to cover, or make sure we emphasize,
and things like that. So we talk about pedagogy. We talk about digital peril. We talk about FERPA, privacy,
ethical issues. And then also, like policies. What do you need to put
in your syllabus? What kind information do
you need to include? Can you mandate this versus
non-mandate this? And the big thing is, is it
part of the curriculum? So a journalism class,
you probably could mandate Twitter. You could say, you have to use
Twitter, because that’s really a tool that journalists
need to know. But when you start looking at
other tools, like a biology class, do they really
need to use Twitter? So you could have that as an
option and always have an option out. And that’s what we talk
about and I encourage them to think about. So we talk about two different,
actually, discussions in this one. We talk about best practices. So we talk about, what do you
think are the most important things to also cover
in your syllabus? What would you cover
in your syllabus? What would you put in there? What kind of statement would
you put in there? What kind of information would
you make sure your students know upfront? So the last section is actually
developing a plan, and this really showcase
the examples. So I put a link in here. My presentation should actually
post on Twitter, probably about towards the
end of this presentation. So you’ll see it there, but you
can go onto the Slideshare I have here and click
on the Planning Map. And this was just here,
showcase examples. And we didn’t say you have to
use this as an assignment. We said, tell us how you
do social media? We use it as a communication
tool. We use it as actual
assignment. What kind of things do you
need to think about before using it? What kind of things do you need
to think about teaching your students before
they use it? What things do you need to think
about as alternative assignments if you need
to put one in there, those type of things. And the great thing about these
is they got feedback from their colleagues. They got to share them, and then
they had to get feedback from their colleagues
about them. So it was a great thing. A lot of conversation
happened in these. This class is always full. I think the last time we offered
this, we had 20 seats. And then I said, OK, I’ll
give five more seats. And I said, that’s it. That’s all I can handle
in this short time of conversation and keeping
up with it and keeping what’s going on. So that’s an important thing to
think about, is how you’re going to handle kind of the
conversation and what’s happening, and how you’re
going to give them feedback, too. And how their colleagues
were going to give them feedback and ideas. And they were going to
feed off each other. It’s amazing to see
what happens throughout this course. So just to look at
post surveys. 94% rated the course
at 8 and plus. So the high scale being
10 the best. I say that’s pretty
good for 94%. You’re always going to have
those one or two people that hate the course or didn’t
really want to take it. Lots of positive comments on
a variety of examples. So you think of navigating
course links, communication with colleagues, examples,
that’s what people want to see is examples. So that was one thing in that
last section, put lots of examples that I found. And then, all the outcomes
had positive feedback on reaching them. But the best part is the real
quotes from the people once they took it. “The ideas from the other
instructors exceeded my expectations. I have learned so much.” “I didn’t realize how
much I didn’t know about social media. It also gave me concrete
examples for really implementing them to my class” They’re great quotes to
hear from people. That means you impacted those
instructors, impacted that faculty that went
through this. “It did exactly what
it promised. It taught me how to use social
media in the classroom.” That’s what I wanted
to do, right? Give it to them. “This course also enlightened
my narrow mind in learning more about the potential of
including social media in classroom.” So this is someone that came in
as a skeptic that said, hm, should I actually do this? Do I want to use social media? So that’s great to hear that
someone changed their mind. These are various examples, I’ll
just kind of talk real quick about these. Joel uses it in his
math class. He’s uses it actually– students will ask questions and
he’ll post video links to the questions they
asked about– the top kind of questions
that come out. Colin up there, Colin
uses it in his computer programming classes. He does Google Hangouts, and
that’s how they work on their group projects. And he can come in there and
help them out if they need help on their group projects
and meet with their teams. They’ll be programming away and
they might not talk for a little bit. And all of a sudden, someone
has a question and needs to talk or share a screen. They can do that. It’s Google+. So Amanda is a graphics
professor. She’s the one that did a lot of
the research, uses it a lot with her students to go through
and really encourage them to blog, post their
products, post what they’re designing– website design, things
like that– and share examples. So part two. This one came about a
year after part one. Said, they want the next step. And that’s what we knew they
had wanted, but we had to prove it. And they mentioned,
we want more. We want to now learn the
tools in detail. So this one I did as a hybrid. I’ve done face-to-face and I’ve
done webinar just to see how attendance is a little
different, and things like that, and how it works out. It’s a four-hour coursework
online and two one-hour face-to-face meetings webinar. It probably could be a one
and a half-hour kind of face-to-meet meeting,
two of those. And we talk about four tools. And I decided to talk about four
specific tools: Twitter, Facebook, Google+
and Pinterest. So four kind of tools that a lot
of people use and work on, and wanted to dig into deeper. So actually, all those
presentations I actually uploaded my Slideshare to. So if you follow the link to
that, you’ll see a lot of those on there, too. And some have recordings with
them talking about them. So this is my contact
information. If you need to get a hold of me
@professorjosh is the easy way to tweet me. jmurdock3– forget the 3– @valenicacollege.edu is my email. My Slideshare is the same
with jmurdock3. I have a Facebook page and my
website, Professor Josh. So what kind of questions
do you guys have? What kind of questions
are out there? AUDIENCE: About Twitter, it
seems like in the past, most of Twitter users were older
and our students weren’t using it. What trends do you see? Do you see more students
using it now? JOSH MURDOCK: So the trends in
Twitter and how it’s changed on the people using it. It still has a lot of people
using Twitter. I would say age group
has changed a lot. And I think a lot of people are
realizing the benefit of it in the communities. You’d see that kind of–
the middle ground, actually, with Twitter. A lot of middle– from the probably 30s on. 30s to 45 or so were the
high users of Twitter. You’re seeing more younger
people actually use it, too. AUDIENCE: Google+ seems to
be slowing in taking off. And people who are Facebook
say, I’ll never use it. So what is your prediction
on– will it build? Will it take? Do you like it? JOSH MURDOCK: So the question
was about Google+ and how it’s changing, and what’s
going on with it. I like it. I like the tools of it. And I like some of the
privacy features. Some of the options with it has
a lot of different options you can set with privacies in
different groups and setting up your different circles. Now they have communities
too, which are awesome. And the Hangouts is the
best feature of all. I think that’s something that
any educator could use, and it’s free and it’s there. So those are definitely
things taking off. But it is a slow network. So it’s changing and
there’s different kinds of users on it. But it’s really interesting. It could be great to teach
someone in a class with that. Especially if you’re using a lot
of Google tools already, it might be a great
environment. And I do have robot stickers
for everyone that’s here. So I’ll make sure everyone
gets robots stickers. But what other questions
do we have? Yes. AUDIENCE: I was wondering
about– because of course, when you’re in a class, using
Twitter in a class, [INAUDIBLE] it’s me, but I’m also
representing my department and my college or university. And so do you have different
Twitter accounts? Just one that’s the one that you
use if you require it of students, and then one just
[INAUDIBLE] at anybody who wants to follow you? JOSH MURDOCK: So the question
is, do you have different accounts for different– as your professor, as
your personal, as those different things? I personally don’t. And faculty ask me about
this all the time. I say, what? With that, it’s up to you. I say, I am who I am, and
I want my students to know who I am. And actually, sometimes it helps
you connect with their students if they learn
a little more personal about you. I think that’s something
that– especially when you teach
totally online, if you can connect with them. But you have to learn your
different privacy settings, that’s important. You have to learn that what’s
public is out there. I always say don’t post
something you wouldn’t want your mother to read or see. So if you think about that,
it’s like, what are you posting out there? Are you including stuff that
might be great for your students and great for the
people you network with, and great for other different
people? I think you kind of have
to choose what you’re going to use it. Facebook has come along
way with groups. Groups are great. I don’t have to be
your friend. We could be in a group and we
can talk and we can chat and have that communication. Google+ you could set up similar
kind of atmospheres and communities and
things like that. Twitter is more probably
your public thing. So if you set up that,
you might want to decide if you want– it becomes more difficult to
handle multiple accounts, too. So you have to think
about that. The more accounts you have– I do handle several accounts,
like our department’s accounts, and Facebook and
Twitter and things like that. So the more accounts you have,
the more tools you have to use, the more understanding,
more times you have to post, more times you have to remember,
that’s my personal versus my professional
and things like that. So that’s something
to think about. AUDIENCE: You had pretty good
feedback from your colleagues on the training. I don’t remember if I saw or
not, was there any sort of statistic of how many of them
were using social media as an integral part of their courses,
like the following system or term? JOSH MURDOCK: We didn’t actually
follow-up with any kind of stats afterwards. I’ve talked with several of them
and I’ve seen them use it, and a lot of them
told me about what they’re doing with it. And it’s really cool to see
how they’re using it or deciding to use it. Some people might just simply
decide to use Delicious as a social bookmarking site or say
I’m going to use YouTube. That’s really what this is
about, is choosing your comfort level too, to
get exposure to it. AUDIENCE: I was just going to
give out a shout-out for the hiring or bringing onto your
team the non-techie person. JOSH MURDOCK: OK. AUDIENCE: Because the division
I work for kind of had that same vision, so I always say I’m
the tech support with no tech skills. But I did bring a very unique
look to their program and what they were doing that was
too high for some students and too low. And I represent a whole slew of
people out there who don’t know very much or are terrified
of it, and I can see a different aspect of it. JOSH MURDOCK: It was really
about bringing on that extra person, and bringing on that
person that might know nothing about social media or very
little, or be skeptical of it, as part of your team when
building a course like this. Because you want to get those
faculty that are on that fence, too, involved. And we have several of them
that said, social media– I’m not sure about that. I don’t know, but I want to
learn, because I know my students need it. And that’s when you find it
really interesting, when your students start needing that
and understanding that. So those are something
you can think about is bringing on that. Do we have– in the back. AUDIENCE: Could you repeat the
four tools that you used, that you decided to concentrate
on [INAUDIBLE]? JOSH MURDOCK: So the question
was about the four tools I decided to use. I decided to use kind of the
more popular ones, or ones that people are asking about
or trying to use. I did Facebook, of
course, Twitter. And then, I actually did
Google+ because of the features with Hangouts, and
privacy, and communities, and great things like that. And then, Pinterest. A lot of educators are looking
at Pinterest and how– instead of social bookmarking,
people are using Pinterest instead of social bookmarking. So it’s kind of changed. And also, I’ve talked with
graphic professors and different people, that they use
it actually to share the information out, to
share inspiration. Here’s these great website I
found or great graphics that someone developed. Let’s inspire. Let’s share this. And this is the way
they use it. So we kind of figured those
different ways. In the back. AUDIENCE: Can you say more
about [INAUDIBLE] Google Tools, what they do? JOSH MURDOCK: So more about
the Google tools. Google+ has some great
community features. Better than Facebook,
I would think. It has some good options
with those. Hangouts, great. You can use Hangouts up to, I
think, nine people now, nine people that you can hangout
with, share screens. They actually have it so now
you can actually take over someone’s desktop. And they have a lot of different
cool things. You can share Google Drive
and share the tools they’re using in that. So you can actually work on a
project together right there all simultaneously. You see the video
stream pop up. I use it for interviews
with people. I used it in my class to conduct
interviews, live kind of interviews, and then
recorded them. And then, posted those, too. So that’s a cool idea, like have
that guest speaker that could be somewhere else and
you don’t have to worry about– it’s a live streaming
through Google+. You don’t have to worry about
buying a new tool or something like that. Well, thank you. And I know everyone wants to
get out and have fun now. So enjoy the rest of the day. [APPLAUSE]

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