Media and Advertising: The Past, Present and Future

Media and Advertising: The Past, Present and Future



1999, I was all about Must See TV. I was watching Friends. Twenty years ago I think I was probably watching TGIF. I was watching NYPD Blue. I think we were also close to the tail end
of 90210 and Melrose Place. Also that year a certain New Jersey mob boss walked into a psychiatrist office and changed Television. 1999 is arguably a pivotal
year in the history of media because it's the Year TiVo and Replay TV first
hit the marketplace, and those were the first devices that really started the
transition we're living in today. I look at 1999 and yes, a lot has happened, but in many ways we’re the same people, we’re doing a lot of the same behaviors. If you went back and thought about what would 1999 – you that I'm most amazed with, it's that the stuff you're watching, the stuff you care about, you can have it wherever you want, whenever you want. As we observe what’s going on in the media marketplace, today, the ability to trust content, its veracity,
its quality, the fact that it is being made so that it will be resonant to you,
but has a trusted brand associated with it, I think there is a return to quality in the offing. I don’t think storytelling has fundamentally changed.
I think storytelling has just gotten much better. And if you think of the proliferation of devices and platforms, there’s just more ways we can tell great stories.
There’s just more ways we can tell great stories. Twenty years ago if an advertiser needed to understand how their ad dollars were impacting a consumer they would be looking at things like linear television, radio, print. Five years from now, the amount of touch points that advertisers and brands will have to engage with consumers is going to be exponentially greater than it even is now. There is, at least now the possibility, of looking not just at how many impressions I delivered but exactly who I delivered them to. Comscore’s been a great partner to the industry, right? Comscore became very quickly, in the early 2000s probably, the gold standard for digital measurement, digital advertising measurement. Comscore was conceived of innovation. It’s hard to remember when what content existed on the web wasn’t measured. And so investments were being made and nobody really was doing a competent job of measuring them. Comscore is there to not only approach existing challenges in the industry, which is, can we do TV measurement better?
Is there a new way to look at the data available and apply it to today’s problems? But also to look forward and say,
what’s over that next hill? Look if we’re all being honest,
it’s hard to predict five years out, let alone twenty years out, right?
But let me make a bold, even crazy prediction. The thirty-second spot will be alive and well in 2039. The constant access and the advent of 5G and machine learning and AI and you know VR and AR, that like these sort of real-life and digital realms are just sort of converging. I think we’re going to see a really interesting evolution,
in the ways that get smarter and more effective at curating their own content consumption experiences and all of the, you know, advertising implications
for what goes with that. I can’t even imagine what things will be like
twenty years from now. With the Internet of things, with addressable media, whether it’s connected TV or streaming audio or voice search, there’s just going to be so much data and so much fragmentation. It’s going to change the way that people need to think about measurement and advertising.

Author:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *