Mark Simmons: Creativity, Marketing & Advertising Guru, Punk Marketing Author, Keynote Speaker

Mark Simmons: Creativity, Marketing & Advertising Guru, Punk Marketing Author, Keynote Speaker



this is a conversational revolution thing our manifesto as a conversation we're not saying you've got to follow those to the letter we're saying it's also what else we're missing here there's nothing that we're going to tell you that you're gonna walk away and go that's it I'm done my whole life has changed basically old old marketing techniques are tired and for anybody in marketing who's doing what he's been doing or she's been doing since day one you're in trouble nothing absolutely nothing's to be taken seriously all right got it good if there's one thing you get from one market about whose business new Melton revolution is to shift in power from corporations to consumers it gives you this sense that you need to feel something in other words some sense that you are connecting to the people that you're selling to too many things have changed in the relationship between brands and corporations and consumers what we're finding now is those three worlds are merging and look the lines in becoming blurry we walk down the street and you hear something we put it online we tell our friends we can text it to people there's no longer it's no longer this what well I'll talk to you about it at a cocktail party well it's all about little tiny brands people are creating this there's places for them to play now that there weren't places before we're doing a song and round now who would like to start people feel that participants in the conversation they don't feel it as passive consumers when people look into it and passionate that's something you can't fake mediocre idea is a very divisive I said yeah they don't care because they don't think it's because you don't give it anything to care about big ideas get people thinking the same on people that look at the bigger picture end up seeing things that happen maybe for ages like how my people overhead because nobody won getting the first time but you'll feel you're Pittman into submission that's not you know enthusiasm is the whole to make this happen it's not about putting more attention on to that thing it's about what's the big idea all of these areas are working together to to move those trends you know what creatives you can be part of the process all the way through is exactly what's going to sell that product and even if the thing you do fails it feels really good having done it prizes include in and out Nike JetBlue Krispy Kreme Doughnuts seniors joan soda program from speed babies a luboc code them gap Levi's Toyota Starbucks board yet seriously Folgers Papa John's Pizza the Nashville house Kodak and buy on that a lot of Krispy Kreme Doughnuts thank you by the way you've been great really appreciate it there are a few rules or principles that we delivered in the Punk marketing manifesto as part of our book and I'm not going to go through all of them but there are about fourteen of them but one of them is is about taking risks and you know it's it's it's a bit it becomes a little bit of a platitude but it's um you need to avoid risk or die in this world you it cannot afford in marketing now to do things that have always been done and assume that they'll work in the future for instance take a web film called subservient chicken which became very successful in the u.s. about four years ago and it was a very small film in terms of a small budget film but it was going to be impossible to judge in advance whether it was gonna work you couldn't buy the reach from frequency that would justify its cost but he was worth it as an experiment and the way it worked even might remember the thing was it was you go online and you would see this big chicken a guy in a chicken suit and it looked like it was a webcam and he could type in anything like dance and the chicken would dance and it looked like it was live you know people couldn't understand how he's actually done and done because you type in anything and he would actually do it and the way it was done by the way was they they tried the they sent out the people in the agency is the agency I used to work for them they sent out emails to all the agency staff saying what would you get the chicken to do and people respond back saying take off your clothes jump on the couch run around the room flap your wings and after about 400 responses they realized that they had all the answers in other words nobody was sending anything new so they're then shot lots of bits of film with all of those answers in and there's a simple algorithm for when you typed in the question you recognize that and play that bit of film and people just couldn't get how that works you know they didn't know the sort of technology behind that and within a week the film had 52 million hits hugely hugely successful and led to the growth and sales of the chicken sandwich which is what is advertising and the the poll purpose of that film was to promote this brand line called have it your way which is Burger King new brand theme so next slide please and that was some stills from the campaign I think it's that next slide so another principle is not to make any assumptions and there are many assumptions here which I think have been taken for granted in marketing that actually aren't true probably never have been true but it's certainly not true now so reaching a mass audience is cost-effective not necessarily it depends if those people like what you're putting out to them repeating the same message will make it stick when I start an advertising used to be had to make sure people sort of and add three to three times before they got it not true if others are doing it must be good so I can follow what other people are doing and I can do a Phillips carousel film if I'm Toshiba and or Sony and perhaps people like me just as much that's not true people treat advertising differently to content not true either it used to be may be the case that you would have and now a message from our sponsors and the ads could be that sales message but over time advertising and marketing is now on the same level as content has to be as good if not better in order to people to engage with that it is becoming content I find the blurring so much that I don't know what the difference is anymore all publicity is good publicity clearly not true there's lots of bad publicity and again with this passing and power to consumers there's many examples of where people are saying very very negative things about your product if you put yourself out there you've got to be prepared for some sort of bad feedback as well as good feedback and lastly marketing is a science and I'm going to come back to that again but I think there's you can understand why but people like to justify themselves in terms of figures and rationality but you can only do it up to a certain point there's always going to be that gap you cannot monetize and you cannot rationalize you cannot add facts and figures too so next slide please so there a couple of campaigns which have broken the rules and this is one campaign for real beauty very well-known case I won't go into too much detail but what it did is it looked at age at industry conventions and say I'm not sure those are true and the industry convention in this case was that in order to advertise beauty products you had to have amazing looking people and people couldn't relate to that women couldn't relate to that in terms of that idealized perfection perfection or ideally a sense of a sense of beauty so they did a different campaign which was all about celebrating imperfections there's another example it says some PNG did and PNG is quite an interesting marketer they usually do big mass media campaigns in their big buyer rather of TV advertising but they had a problem they had this detergent in Israel called biomat and they were trying to reach Orthodox Jews Orthodox Jews do not watch TV so how could you reach them in a way that spoke to their men on their terms and what they did was they drove round big trucks in the neighborhoods of Israel where the Orthodox Jews lived with washing machines on the back and they had a clothes donation drive so they were asking for donations of used clothes which they were going to donate to the poor and they wash them there and there in the trucks so they showed the effect of biomat detergent on the clothes and how much how cleaner it made them but also did a good social campaign you know socially helping people in that community and that's a great way of changing the rules about through through marketing in a different way next slide please another thing is you know consumers aren't always right and I am a big believer in research but I'm only I'm a big believer in research done well or done correctly next next slide there are many brands big successful brands and products which have been launched without any information market research at all and I think it's it's important to understand that there are places times and places to use research and get a gut get a check on whether things going well and course corrects there's also a need to get lots of information upfront about products and markets and trying to understand consumers lives but you can never ask a consumer whether you should launch this particular brand because they do not know you know and it's it's a need and this I think applies to content creators just as much which is you cannot hope to get information about whether it is a good idea all you can do is get as much information about the consumers and the market you're working in next slide so another principle if this what I'm calling revolution is define your enemy like work out who your enemy is and I believe that every brand every marketer has an enemy you know Richard Branson has made huge business you know eight billion dollar business with 30,000 employees around the world of defining the enemy I was as the conventions of the industry whether it's Airlines or trains or banking or vodka or Cola you know when he launched in he launched virgin color in the United States back in about 1999 2000 he did – just like confrontational things in with her sort of tongue-in-cheek things one was he drove a world war ii world war ii tank down Fifth Avenue in New York painted pink which was his the color of the Nichola and the second thing engineer was he challenged the chairman of coca-cola to an arm wrestling match and he had a full-page ad in the New York Times saying Doug averse to CEO of coke I challenge you to an arm wrestling match loser to quit selling your Cola in North America

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