KARIBU South Africa Radio Interview

KARIBU South Africa Radio Interview


[Radio broadcaster announcing new segment
coming up] Mapaseka Mokwele: Now I’ve got to say
to you, Kaya, just before we take a break, I’ve got an interesting group of gentlemen
in the studio with me. And we’re talking about the IndiAfrica Festival. Stay tuned for that because I want to tell you more about that just after this. [Advertisements] [Intro music plays] Mapaseka Mokwele: It’s twenty-four after…
twenty-four after eight at Kaya FM right here at “Home With Mapaseka.” I’m joined in the studio by Themba Ka Mathe, the co-founder
of the IndiAfrica Festival, and I’m also joined by Adam Camenzuli, who is executive director
of KARIBU Solar Power. Gentlemen, thank you very much for joining us in the studio. Now IndiAfrica Festival has been in exist…has brought together…brings together…is conceptualized to bring together the two countries – how
super! Themba Ka Mathe: Thank you very much, Mapaseka.
Thank you very much to Kaya at Home. IndiAfrica is a people-to-people, public-to-public project
that tries to bring together young Africans and young Indians together to try and create a shared vision
of how the future could look like if they can collaborate, coordinate, and co-create
a vision of the future. Mapaseka Mokwele: Why India? Themba Ka Mathe: “Why India?” You know this
is the first question that people ask the first time you say IndiAfrica. Well Mapaseka
India is a young country in motion: one point two billion people exist in India. Mapaseka Mokwele: Yes. Themba Ka Mathe: Half of that one point two
billion people is actually young people, which is 600 million people. In Africa, on one continent you have twenty nine
million people. Mapaseka Mokwele: Yes. Themba Ka Mathe: That is good. So you’ve got
a country with one point two billion people and then a continent that has got less than
one billion people. Mapaseka Mokwele: Okay, but now bringing the
two together in what way though? Themba Ka Mathe: In so many ways, Mapaseka. We’ve…we’ve got a shared culture, we’ve got a shared history
with India, but beyond all of those things I think it’s important that if there’s going
to be an exciting future for ourselves, for the young generation it’s important that we
begin to understand the dynamics…the ways in which Indians operate, share experiences,
and the ways in which they do things. If they begin to do it at the younger age, by the
time they become the main leaders of the industries that they’re in is going to be much more easy
for them to begin to engage and compete or even collaborate with Indians. We won’t be
having a whole lot of sometimes complications or cultural shocks. Mapaseka Mokwele: The festival starts on Monday,
the 13th, right? Themba Ka Mathe: The IndiAfrica Festival…yes,
it started on Monday, the 13th. It’s going on until the 24th of May. But beyond the festival
we’re going to be having a series of campus interactions. They’re not part of the festival
but just touching base and getting to engage with young people at colleges and a few universities. Mapaseka Mokwele: What is the festival actually?
You know when we talk about the festival, but what is actually happening in the festival? Themba Ka Mathe: It’s…it’s a beautiful mixture
of films celebrating one hundred years of Bollywood cinema. We’ve got films, we’ve got
special workshops…collaborating workshops trying, you know, to show young people how
to think differently from how they usually think. We’ve got a whole range of other activities, including exhibitions as well. But today we had a beautiful day at Wits University where Adam
was one of the young visionaries that got to be acknowledged for the kind of work that
they do in trying to create a future within, you know, the locations, within the communities that
they’re in. Adam actually comes from Tanzania. Mapaseka Mokwele: Adam, elaborate on that
for us. Adam Camenzuli: Yeah, thanks very much. So we’re looking to bring affordable solar to Africa and we’ve actually developed a modular solar
lamp as you can see here. [Adam shows picture of solar modular lamp
to Mapaseka Mokwele in the studio] Mapaseka Mokwele: OK. Adam Camenzuli: And by splitting up the components
of the solar lamp we can actually split up the payments for the end consumer, which makes
it a lot more affordable than a regular solar lamp’s. Mapaseka Mokwele: Ok, we’re going to take
pictures of the lamp and then put it on Facebook so that it’s easier for “Home with
Kaya” to see and understand what it’s all about. Ok, tell me more about that lamp. Adam Camenzuli: Ok, so we originally brought
in regular solar lamps…
Mapaseka Mokwele: Right.
Adam Camenzuli: To Tanzania a few years ago.
Mapaseka Mokwele: Right.
Adam Camenzuli: And one of the biggest things that we saw was that the average person can’t afford a solar lamp. And that’s a huge problem because kerosene, which is the current alternative is harmful to people’s health.
Mapaseka Mokwele: Yes.
Adam Camenzuli: Harmful to
the environment, and it’s also very expensive. And people waste a lot of their income on
kerosene. Mapaseka Mokwele: But now when you talk about solar, you know, number one it’s expensive. In the mind we know it to be expensive to
install, to have, to keep. How do you then hope to get that competing with the kerosene? Adam Camenzuli: Exactly, and that’s the innovative
factor that we’ve developed here. By splitting up the payments it works like this. A shop
owner will rent out this portion, which is the battery and the light, to a consumer
for about sixty cents a day and the consumer returns every day and swaps this out for a
fully charged one. And the consumer can’t run-away with this because if they do it’s
out of power.
Mapaseka Mokwele: So…so they can’t do much with it.
Adam Camenzuli: Exactly, and it also charges their mobile phone, which is a huge factor for a lot of
people.
Mapaseka Mokwele: So how does…ok.
Adam Camenzuli: After a month they’ve effectively paid-off for this lamp and they get the solar
panel and by bringing everything together they’ve become solar independent by having
their own solar lantern and they’ve only paid sixty-five cents a day. Mapaseka Mokwele: Hold on, ok. Let me see
if I hear you correctly. So you pay sixty-five cents a day for that part of the lamp only. Adam Camenzuli: Yes, a charged version. Mapaseka Mokwele: Yes, a charge version of
that lamp so you’re renting out the charged version of that lamp for sixty-five cents
a day. After a month that sixty-five cents times thirty will then tell you that you now accumulated enough to now get the solar part of this.
Adam Camenzuli: Exactly.
Mapaseka Mokwele: So you’re going to buy the solar
part. Adam Camenzuli: Exactly. Mapaseka Mokwele: Ok, ok and it charges cell
phones. I see that you’ve put in… Adam Camenzuli: Yeah, we’ve got a couple of
adapters right here for various phones.
Mapaseka Mokwele: Ok.
Adam Camenzuli: Like Nokia, as well as Sony Ericcson. Mapaseka Mokwele: Ok, so how long does that
last? Adam Camenzuli: This lamp lasts up to twelve
hours and there are various settings as you can see here. [Adam shows lamp’s features in studio] Adam Camenzuli: Very, very bright and if it
charges phones that amount of time decreases. Mapaseka Mokwele: You know, Adam, the other
thing that this says to me again is that I need to bring in is that it’s not India-South
Africa, it’s India-Africa. Adam Camenzuli: Yeah, absolutely. Mapaseka Mokwele: So what is the expectation
of the other Africa days? What are we getting? Themba Ka Mathe: Look, IndiAfrica actually
when it started in Africa, it actually started in Kenya, three years ago and the world I
think was about trying to get as many African countries participating in the initiative.
More than fourteen to fifteen countries are participating in the initiative and as for
the other Africans you’d be surprised, Mapaseka, because of the online contestants that we’ve
been collecting over the past two years in photography, essay writing, poster design,
and business venture. You’d be surprised when you see the countries that are so behind…there
was so much entrepreneurship activity as compared to the other countries where you would expect
that there would be too many entries coming from. You know, you look at the kind of conceptualization
of thoughts in terms of poster designs coming from India itself and business ventures young
people would collaborate with business people in India. Just looking at the local conditions
we’ve got a problem in education in here, what problems do we have in education in India,
how do we begin to have a shared solution around that? Mapaseka Mokwele: Actually I was going to
go there. Yeah, are you going to have panel discussions with different people coming with
their different problems and with assuming that India-Africa finding a solution with
itself. So for example you have a problem that maybe Tanzania can relate to and discuss
with South Africa, or maybe something that effects India somehow. Is this discussion
going to be possible? Will you all sit down and say, “We’ve got this; this is how you
solve it.” Adam Camenzuli: There’s actually already been
a discussion for some of the people who met today. We really talked about the similar
challenges that we face in our respective countries. Mapaseka Mokwele: Are you finding that there
are a lot of those? Adam Camenzuli: Absolutely. We face a lot
of the same problems. Mapaseka Mokwele: What are some of those?
Take me through some of them. And I ask you that because we expect, in our minds, that
separate entities that in South Africa that the challenges faced by South African youth
are not necessarily the challenges faced by Tanzanian youth, being faced by Malawian youth.
So let’s bring it all together. Adam Camenzuli: Absolutely. So one of the
similar challenges that we discussed is lighting. It’s energy, and for the most part people
don’t have it and people want it. That’s a shared challenge for a lot of people and lack
of energy, lack of lighting is a huge barrier to development and it’s a huge barrier to
breaking free from poverty. Mapaseka Mokwele: Ok, that’s very big. Themba Ka Mathe: Energy, education, and I
think the environment, are actually big things that bring together India and Africa. Africa
the continent and India as a country are emerging markets in the eyes of the world. You know,
I think those are the commonalities between India and Africa. Mapaseka Mokwele: Ok, we’ve got a caller on
the line who is interested in solar lamps. I want to go straight to Sid. Hi, Sid. Caller: Hi, Mapaseka, how are you doing? Mapaseka Mokwele: I’m lovely, how are you? Caller: Excellent, unfortunately still at
the office. [Laughter] Mapaseka Mokwele: I am too. [Laughter and banter] Mapaseka Mokwele: So what do you want to say? Caller: Yes, my question is for Adam from
KARIBU Solar. You know, I think this model is very interesting and it’s got a lot of
legs for Africa. And I understand currently that you’re in Tanzania. What are your plans
for growth? How are you going to take this product into say, Nigeria or now grow into
Kenya or Rwanda? Adam Camenzuli: Ok, well great. Thanks very
much for your call, Sid, and KARIBU to Tanzania any time you’re in the area. So in order to
grow, in order to scale we leverage the small shop network, which is called the duka network,
or the small business network, with the dukas here in Tanzania or Kenya. So by leveraging
these small shops and these small micro-entrepreneurs we are able to reach a lot of people in a
short amount of time. And for entering new markets, like Kenya and Nigeria, it’s important
to leverage those networks, those small dukas, those small shops and that’s what we’re looking
at doing in Tanzania right now. Mapaseka Mokwele: Sid, does that answer your
question? Caller: No, that does it. Very interesting,
and if I may ask you another question? Adam Camenzuli: Absolutely. Caller: How much does…you know, when Mapaseka
did the math of sixty-five cents times thirty it works out roughly to nineteen point five,
about twenty dollars a month I’m guessing. So how much does it actually cost you create
this? Adam Camenzuli: So in order to create this
it costs a fair bit less and we’re able to sell it at a profit. We’re able to remain
sustainable for the long-term and by doing so we can reach a lot more people a lot faster
than relying on charity or some type of non-governmental organization model. And by doing it as a social
enterprise we’re able to scale sustainably and efficiently, very lean, and very mean
to grow it to reach a lot, a lot of people. Mapaseka Mokwele: All right, so does that
make sense? Caller: Yes, that makes a lot of sense. Thank
you very much and good luck. Mapaseka Mokwele: Thank you very much, Sid,
for the question. Now, do you know what? Let me tell you what fascinates me. We have a
lot of, what do you call them? Do you call them “talk show hosts?” There are a lot of
people who just talk, talk, talk and say, “India, Africa, together we need to work”
and go on and come the 24th of May it’s done and good-bye everyone and it’s forgotten.
So how do you hope to keep this faith? Themba Ka Mathe: The winners of the business
venture competition are actually going to Davos, one from India and the other one from
Nigeria. They’re actually going to Davos to the office of Idea Works there, the managing
partner of the IndiAfrica business venture initiative. So they’ll get an opportunity
to go to Davos and experience the world of entrepreneurship and the world of leadership
and get to test their ideas. But beyond that there is an exchange of…there’s a guy from
Nigeria who will get to go to India and spend some time there. I got to go there to work
last year there as well, Mapaseka. I was part of the students’ apprentice challenge at the
university campus last year and with sixty-four young people we put together and see how they
can test their ideas or use their skills, to become better leaders. The winners of the
challenge as well went to India and spent time in India and get to see how things are
done. Mapaseka Mokwele: But you give them support
throughout the year so not to say that once you’ve done that and it’s over rather let’s
carry on and make sure to next year we have been improving on what we know and our time. Themba Ka Mathe: One thing at a time. You
know, the first three years with a lot of help from the Indian Public Diplomacy Division
there’s been support but you know, there isn’t the support that carries them for the whole
year. You know, carrying for the whole year would be given, just for an example, is this
African guy won the business venture contest and we’ve been putting him in all of these
panels, including today. You know, he flew down from Cape Town just to experience what
we’re doing and to also give judgments, being part of the jury, and to also being part of
workshops and inspiring the other young people in the other workshops we’re conducting. Mapaseka Mokwele: Thank you very much guys
for coming through. Can everyone come be part of this themselves? Themba Ka Mathe: Yes, we’ve got lots of music,
an exciting music line-up at the Majestic Theater and we actually have something happening
now. We’ve got a big show at the theater on Friday, an art expo and we have got the African
Freedom station, we have got [various artists] collaborating with John. There are lots happening.
The festival is starting from the 17th up to the 19th at the Majestic Theater. Adam Camenzuli: I’d also like to mention that
if anyone would like to learn more about KARIBU Solar please log-on to www.karibusolar.com
and I just want to thank my mom for all of her support. Mapaseka Mokwele: Oh, lovely. That’s so sweet!
That’s very, very sweet! Themba Ka Mathe: www.indiafrica.in for more
information. Mapaseka Mokwele: Yes, go to those websites
and get yourself more information about the IndiAfrica Festival. Thank you very much for
joining us gentlemen. It started on the 13th of May and goes until the 24th of May – that
is the IndiAfrica Festival 2013 taking place right here in Johannesburg. Thank you to Adam
Camenzuli, the Executive Director of KARIBU Solar Power and also to Themba Ka Mathe, the
co-founder of this initiative, the IndiAfrica festival. Adam Camenzuli: Asante sana, thank you. [Outro]

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