Ep. 52 Bathing Monkeys, Dinosaur Footprints and Robot Fish | Twig Science Reporter

Ep. 52 Bathing Monkeys, Dinosaur Footprints and Robot Fish | Twig Science Reporter


On this week’s news update– Huge dinosaur footprints
are discovered, scientists create a robotic fish, and why these monkeys
bathe in hot springs. First up, Scientists have been studying
huge dinosaur footprints, thought to be
170 million years old! Around 50 fossil footprints
were recently discovered on the Isle of Skye in Scotland. The researchers photographed,
measured and analyzed the footprints, and found that they were made
by two types of dinosaur, theropods and sauropods. They were left behind during a time
known as the Middle Jurassic Period. The discovery is particularly important
because not many fossil sites from this time have been found
around the world. Next up, it’s Tech Beat. Studying wildlife
can be full of challenges, like how to get close to animals
without disturbing them! Scientists from MIT in the USA
have come up with an invention that could provide
a solution to this problem. This is SoFi,
a soft robotic fish that can swim alongside real fish
and other animals in the ocean. Parts of the robot
are made of rubber and plastic, which help it turn
and bend in the water. It is specially designed
to move quietly, and it uses a camera to record
what’s happening around it. Researchers are still
carrying out tests and making improvements to SoFi,
but they hope it could be used as a tool to help study
our underwater world. And finally, it’s Animal Watch! These are Japanese macaques,
also known as snow monkeys. In the wild, these primates
are only found in areas of Japan. They have thick layers of fur to keep
them warm during the freezing winter, and they also spend time bathing
in hot springs to keep warm. Now scientists have discovered that’s not the only reason
they take a dip. Researchers studied
a group of snow monkeys and found that this behavior
also lowers stress. They analyzed samples
of the monkeys’ poop, and found that bathing
in the hot springs reduced their levels
of stress hormones. So it seems that they take
a warm bath to de-stress and relax, just like humans do! That’s all for this week,
we’ll see you next time!

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