Decreasing Television Viewing

Decreasing Television Viewing


(music)NARRATOR: Just a few
decades ago,
Texas was a different place.The food we ate was grown
in our own communities.
Today, we’re moving
less and eating more.
Nearly one in three Texans are
obese, and obesity has become
a leading cause of death
in America.
But Texans are
bringing healthy back.
Across the state, communities
are being reshaped to support
and transform our
health and well-being.
Because reducing obesity
starts with growing community.
(music) AMY HENDRY: Through Seguin ISD, we have a parenting program. And under that parenting
program, we have Mini Mats Childcare Center. It’s a way for our teens to stay
in school because they do have the daycare available to them. I am Amy Hendry and I’m the
Parenting Program Supervisor. I teach the parenting classes. We’re going to go ahead with
our lesson, and today we’re going to talk about reducing
TV watching for your babies. How many of ya’ll are guilty
of putting your babies in front of the television? How many of ya’ll, when y’all
go home, you turn the TV on immediately for background
noise? How many of you have a special
show you watch because you… BRITTANY CANTU: If somebody
tells you a different way, you kind of learn it better. And that’s what Miss Hendry
and Mini Mats does. AMY HENDRY: It is hard. It is hard to break away
from the TV, because it’s a good babysitter for you,
isn’t it? We’ll talk about why you
shouldn’t and hopefully… WILLIAM DIETZ, M.D.: We showed
a number of years ago that television viewing was
directly related to the risk of obesity in children. And there is a relationship
between the amount of television children watch,
the consumption of the foods advertised on television,
and obesity. NATALIE CLIFTON, M.Ed: Television viewing is the most common sedentary activity
among American children. When you’re watching television,
you’re exposed to the marketing of high-energy dense foods. And children and adolescents
are particularly vulnerable to these messages that are
conveyed on TV. WILLIAM DIETZ, M.D.: We know
that children who have televisions in their room
tend to watch more television. NATALIE CLIFTON, M.Ed.:
Children whose parents watch a lot of TV also tend
to watch a lot of TV. You can now find televisions
everywhere you go. You can see televisions
in airports, and malls, and grocery stores,
and restaurants, and cars. So if we’re going to reduce
television viewing, we need to start with the environment. WILLIAM DIETZ, M.D.: One of the
very important environments for children are
childcare facilities. AMY HENDRY: Our TV policy here
at Mini Mats is not to offer TV in the classroom. It’s all about creativity
and imagination. The children are always
singing and dancing, and running and playing,
and learning social skills. Okay, look at this chart. What age should your baby
start watching television? The blue represents the hours
that are actually watched. The red or burgundy represents
the recommended hours. Your babies are all 2 or under. Two and under, zero hours. Two to four, little to no TV. Children under the age of two
should not be watching any TV. It’s bad for their development,
bad for language development. Play is the foundation
of a healthy childhood, and this is the primary way
that children learn. So what are some activities
that you can do instead of watching TV? STUDENT: Play. AMY HENDRY: Play outside, go to
the zoo, visit the library. How many of y’all go to the
library and read some books? The park is great. So just get outside and
interact with your kids. BRITTANY CANTU: After taking
that class, I realized, you know, she doesn’t
really need TV at all. She has so many, so much stuff
she can do, and so much stuff she can learn, and there’s
really no need for TV. AMY HENDRY: The home environment
plays a big role in how much TV they watch. If the parent has activities for
them, and sets them up for play instead of TV watching. DEBBIE CANTU: We adapted to
the way they were running the daycare a little bit more
in that aspect, you know. I think it’s a good thing,
because they need to learn at an early age, you know. It’s not about the TV. AMY HENDRY: Next week is
“Turn Off Your TV Week.” Ya’ll think ya’ll
can turnoff your TVs? Here’s your pledge, “I will work
to take a break from television and related activities such as
videos, DVDs, computer games, and video games.” Hopefully, they do listen to
maybe one thing I say out of the many topics we cover, just so
that they can better themselves, and better themselves
as a parent. WILLIAM DIETZ, M.D.: It’s worth
noting that no single strategy alone for obesity is
likely to be successful. That our efforts really need to
address nutrition and physical activity in a variety of
settings where people spend time. NATALIE CLIFTON, M.Ed.:
In order to combat the obesity problem in Texas, we need
Texas communities to take the initiative, and begin
implementing policies and practices in a
variety of settings. BRITTANY CANTU: She has a lot to
learn in the world, and it’s so interesting instead of just
sitting at home, watching TV, and doing nothing.NARRATOR: To learn more, visit
TexasBringingHealthyBack.org

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