Carolina Classrooms: College and Career Readiness 2019

Carolina Classrooms: College and Career Readiness 2019


I’m Angel Malone, Director of
Career and Technical Education at the South Carolina
Department of Education. I’m happy to serve as your guest
host for this episode of Carolina classrooms. Today’s
topic is about college and career readiness more
specifically workforce development including high
demand job opportunities that are available within the state.
At one point in time every student is asked, what do you
want to be when you grow up? Once upon a time responses to
this question seemed limited, doctor, teacher, nurse,barber or
beautician, maybe an accountant or a job and one of the local
plants. Now students are made aware that the opportunities
are endless. We are certainly a state that has its roots in
manufacturing but the jobs our parents and grandparents held
have transformed into a new career paths that look
completely different than they did twenty or even ten years
ago. There are a plethora of careers to choose from and we
want to be sure that each and every student in South Carolina
has access to resources to make the career decision right for
them. Once students choose a career, there’s another major
decision to make. How do I make this happen and does this
journey or path lead to attending a four year college
or two years of training after high school? In this episode we
inform parents of the ways schools and state agencies in
South Carolina work together to create opportunities for
students whose career path leads them to obtain a
credential within two to three years out of high school. In
some cases there are opportunities that take even
less time than this. Not only will we take a look at
opportunities available for students straight out of high
school, but we will also take a look at options available for
persons who may I have taken a nontraditional path to
employment or career advancement. We have an allstar
panel of guests today, many of whom are leading the state’s
efforts to develop and retain a skilled workforce. We’ll take a
look and workforce development in three segments, looking first
at where the jobs are then at the pathways to success and
finally, ask successful models for collaboration among
community partners, education and business and industry. We
also had an opportunity to speak with a group of eighth
graders about their career interest. You will hear their
voices and some of the questions that we ask the panel today. You
will also get to see some of their conversations and
thoughts about college and career readiness throughout the
show. Let’s start the conversation by
taking a look at where the jobs are. Joining us in this segment
are Shuana Davis, who works with Strategic Partnerships at the
South Carolina Department of Employment Workforce, Elizabeth
Kovacs, Deputy Director of Workforce Development at the
South Carolina Department of Commerce, Susie Shannon,
President and CEO of the South Carolina Counsel for
Competitiveness and Doctor Peggy Torrey, Director of
Education also at the South Carolina Counsel for
Competitiveness. Let’s start questions ladies.
Our first question is what are the current high demand jobs in
South Carolina? So currently across the state,
so one of the things that the state did is a supply gap
analysis that showed us where our demand is and it is
construction, it is manufacturing, it is business
and I.T., healthcare, wholesale trade and logistics are, are where most of
our in demand jobs life right now. And if you could add
context to that, what are the salaries associated with those
jobs? On the average wage in South
Carolina is about forty three thousand dollars and with
regard to healthcare construction and manufacturing
each pay above the state average with manufacturing
leading the way at almost sixty thousand per year. Wow. That,
that’s incredible. Sixty thousand dollars for a
manufacturing job. Amazing.I can top that, Angel. Yes.
So some of the industries that we work very closely with at
the council, our aerospace companies all the way from
Boeing as an original equipment manufacturer all the way to the
smallest supplier. We also work closely with logistics company
all modes, railroads, maritime air freight and also we’re in
the process now in collaboration with the South
Carolina Department of Commerce and others and to defining and
organizing a technology in cyber security cluster and some
of the preliminary analysis that we’ve seen around that the
tech and cyber security world is it’s more than seventy
thousand dollars and there are thousands of unfilled jobs
across the technology and cyber security sector whether you’re
talking about tech jobs and tech firms or tech jobs and non tech
jobs or non tech jobs and tech firms. I think I got the trilogy
of that right. Now we can’t, we can’t forget
about air space. We did a study a couple of years ago and
found that the average the average and this includes your
entry line workers like the flight mechanics who come in
entry wise making about fifty to sixty thousand. The state
average there is about seventy eight thousand dollars and so
that’s a nice little package are for South Carolina and then
logistics is usually average around somewhere over fifty
thousand but more than seventy five thousand dollars when
you’re talking about those logistics workers that are
embedded in some of our industries like BMW or like,
Boeing. So, just in the logistics sector
alone we’re expecting across the country probably a nine
hundred thousand dollar truck driver shortage which could
potentially or is already resulting in some higher
shipping cost. Truck driving of yester year
is not like the truck driving of today. Some of these trucks
have semi autonomous very cool technologies embedded. These
trucking companies are offering sign on bonuses for
instance, much entry salary at actually above the
state average and offering on the job training and some
career opportunities. Wow. So, those are just average salaries
of fifty to seventy five thousand dollars and I think
Susie you said wait great right into what we want to talk about
next and that’s the trends. Where do you all see the trends
going in five to ten years from now so far as jobs are
concerned? If we had a crystal ball.Well,I going to
actually put it back to Susie to talk a
little bit about the technology cluster because we’ve really
done some research around that and have some good information
about what’s coming. The technology is huge. So, we did.
I going to consult my notes here because it’s fairly
fairly new we did our preliminary analysis around the
technology sector in South Carolina. Right now we employ
over a hundred forty thousand tech workers
with an average salary of over seventy thousand in excess of
eighty five hundred tech firms spread across the state. In
fact between twenty seventeen to twenty eighteen we netted
more than four thousand tech related jobs, but what’s
interesting is some of the national predictions are that
by twenty twenty to sixty percent of businesses will be
affected by artificial intelligence and in some way
with about forty percent jobs by twenty thirty
significantly impacted. I don’t necessarily ascribe to the dire
predictions that the robots are gonna come in and take our jobs
althogh Walmart is actually deploying robots to do some of
the janitorial type of services. These projections are changing
every nanosecond because the technology is constantly
evolving. I’m an attorney by trade. They’re actually talking
about machine learning capability replacing lawyers
one day. I know there’s probably some applause going out there
somewhere. Luckily, though, our very important paralegals
are safe but so I think companies have to do,
will have to do more in investing in training and
retraining because the automation is already taking
over. If you, if you look at an airplane it’s essentially a
flying computer. The avionics in these things are are pretty
amazing. Even if you look at the automobile manufacturing
industry, the just in time inventory, when, when those
steering wheels you know go right up to the dock at B.M.W. they’ve got to go on in the precise come in in the dock the
precise order that they’re going to be installed on the
cars and so we’re going to see more augmented
collaborative technologies around on even our advanced
manufacturing sector. I would piggy back
that and to say even I would go beyond I was in the
health care meeting this morning and and twenty thirty
South Carolina is number four with the the highest healthcare
shortage of nurses so I think automation is one thing but
then there is this huge generation that’s about to
retire and you know who’s going to take care of them and
what does that look like for the emerging work force and how
do we train them? So I think the trends will continue to change
with technology and innovation across the board and beyond
manufacturing and in healthcare and logistics and all of those
areas. I think we’ll continue to see that the trends
change and it it shift into more involving technological
work force. Wow. Thank you and that that is definitely
true we talk about artificial intelligence. Elizabeth I
want to ask you about manufacturing. We know that one
of the biggest areas of demands in the state is manufacturing. I
just want you to share. How is the field changed over the
years and one of the biggest misconceptions that people have
about the particular field of manufacturing? Well we talked
about technology and technology drives manufacturing right
manufactures think they have research and development and
they’re thinking about the next big thing right when you talk
about our our Boeing’s and air bus and things of that nature.
The process has changed of course manufacturing employees
a lot of folks and I think the the misperceptions are is in a
manufacturing has all different types of jobs, right. You can be
an accountant and you can work in manufacturing. You can be anything you want to be right.
So they need graphic artists in manufacturing, they need
research and development engineers,production facilities.
Manufacturers make a significant impact with regard
to financial investment right. So think, to give students and
teachers and parents an idea is when a manufacturing plant
announces that they’re going to locate or expand in South
Carolina. The costs associated with that are just exponential
compared to so let’s just say Amazon for example. When Amazon
announced in South Carolina, it was like a twenty five million
dollar investment, with five hundred jobs. Right down
the street, Nephron Pharmaceuticals spent two
hundred thirty million dollars in equipment and seven hundred
new jobs announced. So when you look at manufacturing what it
does to a community, the types of of jobs and the types
of average wage they have, it changes significantly. So,
modern twenty first century manufacturing is clean
structured process that needs people who can meet those
demands and this is not just in South Carolina this is
internationally. Absolutely. So those students that want
to go into that field would be globally competitive not just
for our local area. So I’m gonna ask you all to kind of
think about,I always think about when I was a student in school
very long ago.What would you say to a student that asked how do
they know that they found the right career and then how would
you share that with parents? What would you say? I think you always have to find something that you love to
do obviously something that you’re fairly good at but
you don’t always want to be having to deal with things that
you’re not comfortable with. So when we
talk with kids we talk about the fact that you want to
go down your six lane highways you know there’s a book that
talks about this. You want to, you want jobs that use those
things that you are good at,that use those things you enjoy.
Yes, we all have to develop in other areas as well, but find
your passion. Do something that’ll never really be work
for you. That would be my
advice. I think it’s lifelong learning
too, right. So we’re gonna learn things the new generations you
know want different things and
probably won’t be in the same occupation for a long
time, but again you have to follow your passion and you
have to know how to utilize the skills you have and
how you adapt them to other situations, so.
It’s a perfect segue into the question about what’s the ideal
candidate because what we hear we facilitate
conversations between students and businesses all the time and
what we hear is they don’t want people coming in with very
specific skills and knowledge, they want people that know how
to learn and how to unlearn and relearn that adaptable and
flexible because you have to think on
your feet you have to be able to change
and they talk about repetitive change and that you know you
can’t learn something once anymore you have to learn to re
learning relearn again. So I think that ability to be
flexible and adaptable and persevere is really where they
want people to be now. Absolutely. I would say critical
thinking skills. I heard one employer who said he hires
athletes over anyone else. He said their ability to
build together and work as a team and learn plays he
said that’s always a thing that drew him in and I thought wow
I guess it does, it spreads across your lifetime. You said
life long learner you know those critical thinking skills
being able to adapt and work with other people being able to
show up on time, those are the things that they’re looking for
and those are the things that matter. And to problem solve on
your feet. Right, right. In the moment. In the moment.
Absolutely. Wow. Yeah, those essential soft skills are what
what’s necessary. So we talked about what the, what those
companies are looking for in an ideal candidate. What I want you
to share this time, are there any initiatives that you
are tackling as an agency in your respective agencies that
you’d like to share as relates to workforce development?
Sure, so Department of Employment and Workforce along
with some of our partner agencies Department of Commerce
and State Tech, Department of Education,
Commission on Higher Ed have kind of band together and are
all supporting the work of sector partnerships and what
sector partnerships is is basically, partnerships of
business from the same industry in one labor market who are
coming together as a group to meet the needs of business and
industry and so in a typical meeting you have business and
industry at the center this. Is C. suite level those who can
make decisions and then on the outside of the room you have
education economic development and work force and and across
agencies I think we’re all kind of having some hearing some of
the same issues from business and industry but we are working
more together collaboratively to kinda attack those
issues and and trying to meet the needs of business and
industry really hear what they’re saying so that we could
do it and all band together more strategically. That’s
wonderful to hear that we actually have that voice of
business and industry sharing beyond even those essential
soft skills those technical things that they’re looking for.
Anyone else? Well and the the schools that we’ve been working
with have been great and we’ve been working in both airspace
and logistics to develop and push out an S.R.E.B.
approved curriculum within the high schools. One for
aerospace engineering the other for supply chain for logistics.
We’ve rolled out in six schools for the aerospace
we’re now in eight schools which are servicing ten high
schools across the state and so happy to report that
after the first year, two of our participating students both of
whom came from under represented populations and
engineering generally scored in the top percentile nationally
and that uniform assesment just give me goose bumps and
then Emerald in Greenwood for the second year in a row scored
in the top entire school score on the aerospace engineering and
and you know even if those kids decided not to matriculating
and move on into an aerospace engineering career
there’s a good foundation laid with a STEM career pathway that
can be ported to other occupations and then it just
another the logistics so we’re working with Apex and Michelin
to do a lemonade supply chain game inside the schools.
We need volunteers if anyone is interested, but it’s it’s so
cute to walk those kids through how that dog food
gets to their front doorstep after you yell out Hey Alexa re
ordered the dog food, right. You have no idea how it actually
gets from a to the house and that’s been going very well. I
would like to say really quick I know were wrapping up but our
Transform S.C. movement was started by
businesses and superintendents that wanted to address twenty
first century learning and that really realized that the
schools of today really were built for a very different age
so they are looking at a lot of new ways to do teaching and
learning that meet the needs of the twenty first century
learner and really teach those soft skills that we’ve just
been talking about that everybody needs. Well I want to
thank you all for being here today as we’ve gone over the
gamut of workforce development and many different pathways
while we balance what we have going on now with the emerging
careers that are coming. Thank you for what you’re doing and
the initiatives that you’re carrying on to ensure that
every student every child has the opportunity to be
successful in college careers and citizenship for the state
of South Carolina. Thank you. Thank you for having me. ♪ My name is Richard Toliver. I am the career development
facilitator. My main focus here at Hand is
just giving all of the students and exposure to
different careers relative to the sixteen career
clusters and just working with them with soft skills and trying
to bring in different guest
speakers to speak with them and just
give them an exposure as well as an experience. I have really
enjoyed my time in this position and I’m
continuously learning. I myself didn’t know what I
wanted to do as far as a career so I feel like this is the
perfect opportunity for me to help somebody else at a young
age so they don’t have to waste a lot of time not really
knowing what they want to do and wasting a lot of money as
well if you go to school for the wrong
degree. I’m preparing to bring in some guest speakers to
work with them as far as those soft skills areas. They will get
an experience from different guest speakers they will come
in and they’ll be in the classroom and they’ll talk to
the students about what they do and what it took for them to get
where they’re at. We had a news reporter come in, we had an
artist. I actually sent out a letter to
all of the eighth grade students’ parents to try and
promote parent involvement so this was to just inform them of
the different career I mean the different
just opportunities in things that are going on here at the
school so I told them about the career day and I asked them if
they would like to be a part of it come in to be a guest
speaker so hopefully that could spark communication between the
kids and the parents at home and just them talking about
different careers they’d be interested in. A lot of the
students are interested in making the big money
but to be honest a lot of them don’t know exactly how much the
careers make like certain careers make so that’s also my
job to kind of give them an idea of if they’re going to go
a specific route how much money they’ll be earning once they
get their certifications or degrees.
We have a lot of very wise students here at Hand
and they definitely able to figure things out and work
through conflicts and resolve things. ♪ Joining us in this segment are Timothy Keown, Director of
the Education Center at the John De La Howe School for
Agriculture, Stephen Mason, Associate Vice President for
Economic and Workforce Development at Denmark Technical
College and Joe Renwick A.K.A. Bio Joe, owner of Green Energy BioFuel. Thank you gentlemen
for sharing your voice in this important conversation. We’ve
heard about where the jobs are but I want us to dig a little
deeper into how persons can get them. So we’re gonna start off
just sharing a little bit about career and technical education
with our new legislation, the Perkins V, where that funding
is funneled towards career tech ed and collaborating with
education, business and
industry. Right? So how did those things
come together and Tim we’re going to start off with you.
Tell us about that new school of agriculture and how does it
fit into the conversation of workforce development? Okay the
John Dela Howe School use the word new but it’s actually the
oldest public school in South Carolina the
still in existence going back to seventeen ninety seven.
However the mission that we’re doing now is new. Is brand new,
so we’re re branding the school it’s a just a little bit about
us a thirteen hundred and ten acre campus in rural McCormick
county it all joins lake Thurman. It’s a beautiful campus
it is reminiscent of a nineteen thirties Clemson campus.
So what we’re doing now is is is recreating that school
to teach the state’s top students who were interested in
agriculture, forestry, life sciences and natural resources.
And so by doing that we’re heavily recruiting this year in
the meantime were remodeling our dormitories for students. We
want to be ready for eighty students in August of twenty
twenty. Grades ten and eleven.
So the course offerings that will have
in our curriculum we’re gonna to have three major pathways.
And one pathway will be plant animal science and under that
pathway you’ll have classes such as
livestock production, poultry production, equine science, soul
science, agribusiness. And then our second path would
be horticulture and that’s the states one of our state’s
largest industries under agriculture and within
horticulture will be landscape management, landscape design,
green house management, and turf grass management. And
within that pathway their students also be all for
pesticides re certification courses etcetera. Our third
major pathway will be we call E&R for short but
environmental and natural resources and with our campus
hosting boasting nine hundred and fifty so acres of of timber
we really want to focus heavily on forestry and also being on
the lake. We want all for aquaculture classes,
soul science again under that pathway and those students
within that pathway will learn a lot of
hands on trades that they might not get to their local high
school. We know being a former ag teacher at Creset high
school we had a a great ag Ed program but
the school that we’re at now just offers the natural
resources and the land that that I could have never had
that high school. So we want our students to come out
with a couple different options. When they come to our school
option one would be just a general high school diplomas
hopefully at the governor’s school then and neighboring
legislation to be renamed the governor’s school in January of
twenty twenty but when their students come out option one
will be just a general high school diploma with a
certification of their choosing that certification can range
anywhere from ag mechanics again the natural resources
plant animal science a plethora of certifications.
And that’s due to we want to be ready to go to work if that
student does not choose to attend a college. We want that
student to to be ready to go to work in one of
those industries. The second option would be for
students to we’re in we’re in the Peedmont tech region and so
we’re working with Peedmont tech for dual enrollment courses
especially in general education and we’ve had recent
conversations with them about the ag ed curriculum in those
conversations are still are being had before August twenty
twenty. And then the third pathway
or the third option for the student would be
to prepare them for one of our when the state’s land grant
institutions either Clemson Univercity of South Carolina
state and we’ve had plenty of conversations with both
universities. We want to be able to follow our students directly
to their college of agriculture. Okay all right well definitely
thank you for sharing that information. I had the
opportunity to come and visit and I’ll tell you the only job
training that is available for those students is amazing and
the ability to accelerate their knowledge after leaving high
school and moving on to whatever path they choose is
wonderful. I think the key word that you said was options. So
that’s great that you have those options there. So I’m
gonna ask you what type of career options are available
after a student leaves your school if they’re interested in
agriculture. I’ll break it down again by pathways. So the plant
and animal pathway a lot of South Carolina agriculture is
becoming more vertically integrated and you can look
at the poultry industry for example. The poultry
industry in South Carolina is our state’s number one dollar
producer in AG. It and by the way that sock on
agriculture produces round forty forty five billion
dollars in in our state provides around sixty eight to
seventy thousand jobs across South Carolina. So within that
plant animal pathway there so many jobs and I mean
ranging I heard earlier from truck drivers. Those
those folks are needing people who will show up to work on
time and I think that our with a strong work ethic and and I
think that our school will be able to prepare those students
who as soon as they graduate a ready to go to work like that.
Within the horticulture horticulture industry again in
South Carolina one the our second largest revenue
producers tourism and along with tourism is golf courses.
Where we’re we’re we’re our school is the John Dela Howe
school were surrounded by golf courses state park and several
other over near Savannah lakes village.
So work based opportunities for our students within the golf
course industry. That’s super exciting well I think we can
place if our students are interested in that I think we
can place everyone of ours at one of the local golf courses
there. And then the forestry natural
resources pathway we just met with the forestry commission
and the forestry association last week on our campus and
they’re in dire need again I heard the word truck drivers
earlier. They’re they’re looking for truck drivers, logging
equipment operators and the really cool thing about our
property again those students are not going to learn how to
drive a bulldozer on a computer they’re going to actually learn
how to drive a bulldozer. We have those those options for
our students and it is our student again if they
choose when they graduate will be able to go to one of those
industries of their choosing and and go right to work. Thank
you for that. That’s amazing to have those options. So Steven
I’m gonna ask you as as the VP of Denmark technical college
you belong to our state system of sixteen technical colleges.
Unique to that system is the fact that those students
actually have a residential housing on campus in a rural
area. What types of opportunities does your college
offer to support work force in the rural area. We have several
programs we have from cyber security, barbering, cosmetology
my favorite electro mechanical engineering,
Mechatronics, culinary arts, AOT an the list goes on and on. I think one of the benefits
of being able to come to Denmark technical colleges is
the dorms. We can provide that for you but we also have
partnerships with our local
industry. Where we do internships, we do
coops, we do apprenticeship best one of our big areas is
apprenticeships so it gives the students the opportunity to get
their hands on. It’s one thing for me is a professor to say
need to be on class on time but it’s another thing for them
to understand when the industry says you need to be to work
on time right all I can do is is mark you tardy. They can fire
you. So it you get that direct impact and direct feedback so
they can see what we teach in class relates to what you going
to be doing later on in life. Yeah well I’m excited to hear
about cyber security that something huge that’s on the
horizon if not already emerging here. It’s a growing field how
would you describe that that to a person who knows nothing
about it and what types of pathways are available? I think
everybody hears about hacking hacking hacking right in
everything we don’t think about a lot of times but everything
that you do from your cell phone you know many time you
check your bank account to see how much money you’ve got a you
how much money you don’t have. Just like you do that,,
somebody else is trying to do the same thing and if you think
about the cars that are going to drive themselvest is
computerized. Well guess what I
wanna have some fun today. Let’s see if we can
hack that car and mess it up and or when you get your
keys locked in the car how you can now just call and get the
services to unlock your car or you get a code when you can
unlock your car. Those are the
kind of things that we we’ve starting
to just become dependent on whether the industry it also
their job is hacking. So if if you’re interested in computers
I think one thing that that I try to get my students to
understand is if you say you want to be you should love your
subject. People who want to be football players
and basketball players where they’re at at all times a day
when they’re not in class playing basketball playing
football. Well if you want to be in cyber security you should
you should be glued to computer all the time. Trying to perfect
your professionalism so that you get that experience from
all kind of ways it’s not always always you’re not you
don’t always get everything from the classroom there’s a lot
of stuff. That’s wonderful. Well bio Joe
with bio fuels and and the new rage about alternative fuels I
want to know what types of opportunities are available
with your company. That’s a loaded question but
there’s a lot of different kinds of jobs and roles that we
have. It’s interesting being in a bio fuel industry a lot of
people think that it’s outside of their reach. That it’s
something new and different and then that they wouldn’t be able
to apply or wouldn’t work but I mean we need truck drivers to. I
mean for every gallon that we sell it has to be put in a
truck and delivered to our door and I mean we have employees
that are making fifty sixty seventy thousand dollars a year
driving. Which you know me as the owner paying the salaries
and I’m glad to pay them number one but I’m actually kind of
surprised that man we’re you know we spend a lot of money
on these roles and there’s a lot of benefit to be
placed in someone that loves their job that enjoys doing
their job and to be a good safe driver. I mean it sounds simple
just like being able to show up to work on time sounds simple
but for some reason it’s one of the toughest things. So and
driving’s one aspect maintenance and so you know we
have automated heating systems and and tank tracking system to
tell the fluid levels and the volume level and
of these things that we’ve had to spend hundreds of thousands
of dollars to pay other companies to install within our
plant but now we need people to operate and maintain these
systems. So now there’s this
whole other side of our business
that is now finding people to perform maintenance roles and
maintenance tasks to repair and fix these things which doesn’t
always take the technical ability to know exactly how to
build program install it but how to find the part that’s
broken fix and repair it. And so there’s a lot of of different
types of people that can find a home within the bio fuel
industry you know we used to only hire you know chemistry
majors or engineers. And now we’re open doors to
anyone that gonna not lie cheat or steal
and that can show up on time and that have the willingness
to learn because a lot of what we do is not necessarily in a
classroom taught or because the bio fuel industry they’re not
gonna have gotten this information working for another
bio fuel company because there just aren’t very many at all.
And so we do a lot of on the job training and really it’s
just somebody with the willingness to work
and a passion for for doing a good job and it doesn’t require
to have a college degree and we’ve got I would say more than
fifty percent of our staff did not get a college degree and
some of the staff that didn’t performing vastly more
important roles than some of our staff that did. And so we are
finding various different places to hire people from that
have or haven’t gone to college in in some we’ve actually done
very will an associate degree program
graduates. Where they I don’t know they seem to work harder
which is interesting. So what’s
the most exciting part of your job?
I recycle waste that smells bad into a clean burning bio fuel
that smells good. So we recycle animal fats and
vegetable oil from restaurants and food service industries
all over the southeast now and we take this waste product that
will likely would have otherwise been thrown out and
we’re creating a clean renewable fuel with it that can
run in any diesel engine with no modification and
after eleven years of doing this out of kind of waiting on
the cathc. Like how can you make fuel from waste that runs
eighty percent cleaner then the non toxic and you get
just as good or better fuel mileage but
we’ve been doing it for eleven years. Wow that is wonderful.
Well you all have shed light on the careers that maybe students
haven’t thought about so in ask you how would students find out
more information about your respective companies or schools.
For our company you can just go to GEbiofuel.com or Google
anything related to South Carolina biodiesel recycling
and we usually pop up at the top of the list but just go on
our website and following on social media.
We will be www.Denmarktech or the technical
college system may we all under one big umbrella so
if we can’t help you one of us is to colleges surley can.
And our website is brand new this past week its
delahowe.sc.gov/ and our
admissions process is already online as well. So one plug for
use current night than tenth graders in South Carolina who
are interested in and the ag forestry and natural resource
world go ahead and send your application come to our school
within this year because we start up August twenty twenty
ready to roll. That is awesome. Just in another year the
students will be able to come in and be a part of this
process. I want to thank you all for being here Tim, Stephen and
Mr bio Joe thank you so much for sharing this for those
students that need this type of access and have not even
thought about these particular careers. These are careers that
are here and those that are emerging that will give
students a host of opportunities to be
competitively global. So thank you so much. Thank you. ♪ The career that I want that I am interested in is being a
cop. I want to help the community
from gun violence. Well I’d like to be on Broadway and
musicals because i Just. I want to own my own marketing
business. After high school I would love to go to a
veterinary school and become a vet.
I want to go to college to study law. I like doing computer
stuff. Either be a pediatrician or a doctor. After
high school I would like to go to the university of
South Carolina honor school and after that become a
business analyst or an electrical engineer. ♪ I have no clue. A lot of money.
a lot of money. Like a hundred thousand or
something close to that. My dream school is Juilliard but
pace university is would also be one that I’d love to go to but
quite expensive. So scholarships would hopefully
take care of that with good grades. A very lot of money. I think it’ll be a lot
especially with vetinary school but I’m hoping to get a
scholarship because I have pretty good
grades up till now. ♪ We’ve heard about where the
jobs are we’ve heard about some of the pathways to get there
and it’s been great information. But what does this look like in
the local communities. We know there are great opportunities
available for students right out of high school, however some
take the nontraditional path into work force entry. Joining
us to talk about community partnership models are
Elizabeth Williams Dean of workforce development at
central Carolina technical college, Marc Himes program
manager at the center for fatherhood and families and
Calvin lucky a participant in the Midlands fatherhood
coalition. Welcome. Thank you. We’ll start off with you Marc
talking about that fatherhood and families center describe
the components of the partnership between the South
Carolina centers for fatherhood and families and central
Carolina technical college and the companies in South Carolina.
Sure so South Carolina center for fathers and families were
part of a statewide network of father programs. And with those
programs we help fathers be better at whatever they need
help in. Whether it’s taking care of their child, having
better relationships and of course one big part of being a
parent is employment and and being able to to provide for
their children. So we’ve been working statewide especially
with the technical schools to enhance our relating to
relationships really provide better opportunities for our
participants so that they can get the training and skills
that they need to get employment. We also work with
those employers in those different communities to create
better opportunities to really streamline the process of
getting our participants
employed. Wonderful that’s great that
what you’re doing impacts generations to come leading
with those individuals who are the heads of their homes. What
are some key components to helping your participants with
job opportunities. Well I think one of the segments talked
about earlier for one you got to know what you should be
doing it is what I call you say your is your calling. One of
things we do we have a a soft skills training what we call
employability boot camp which is a week long training to get
people prepareed for job skills and and opportunities and also
we do it an assessment so they can kind of see what okay what
are my interests. What are my skills. What should I be
focusing on because a lot of the times people fail because
in the wrong place. And so when you’re in the right place then
your skills and so forth and then you can do your best and
and really shine in those opportunities. So we really work
to get the the soft skills training to connect with those
employers that are going to be willing to work with our
participants who come from all different backgrounds and
and there is experiences whether it’s you know having
something on your record to lack of education. We really
work to make sure those are those opportunities are
available to all of our participants because there’s so
many opportunities you know it even employment wise there
a lot of things out there and so we really want to meet the
needs of the work force along with providing our participants
with those opportunities. That’s wonderful I am glad that you
said calling we’ve heard the word throughout this segment
about finding your passion you said finding you’re calling in
the Latin word for that is for a car a which is vocational and
there are times that we term the war vocational is something
for the other students who were all trying to find that calling.
So let me ask you what skills do
you think employers are looking for
in South Carolina. Well so many of the panelists deal with
those employees on on a regular basis but when we have those
those conversations they’re looking for for basic skills
that’s like I said the soft skills because you can train
people to to fix the gadget or or do whatever it is but you
can’t go to get to work on time if your time management skills
aren’t good. We’ve worked with employers that they have
complaints as simple is not coming to work because football
on Friday. Little things and and so they’re just looking for
fate people are faithful people that’ll do is ask them that are
you know life long learners as as was spoken before really
attentive and and you know understand how to communicate
with their supervisor with their co workers. So the soft
skills is really the biggest thing that we’re seeing and
then there’s also a big need for some of these other jobs
that are out there you know you you’ve got the the large
companies that have come here and they’re looking for certain
skill sets. And so now we have a shortage of people with certain
skillsets and I think that’s one of the options we try to
take advantage of is getting our participants connected with
technical schools to get the training. So that they can meet
the needs of the of the work force. I agree with you on
that and Elisabeth as the dean for with central Carolina we
know that the technical college offers a number of pathways to
support workforce development. One of those is the youth
apprenticeship program. Can you speak to this initiative and
how students can get involved in that that effort. Sure youth
apprenticeships are really a great opportunity for high
school students to become exposed to
any type of industry. So the way it’s set up is the high school
student is still in high school usually a junior senior and
they’re taking their classes leading toward their diploma
but at the same time they could be at central Carolina or at
another technical college taking courses within a
specific program. While at the same time working with an
importer employer sponsor working part time and earning a
wage. So it’s a really great opportunity at South Carolina
is very fortunate to have the apprenticeship Carolina which is
part of the technical college system and their a great help
with employers and colleges with central Carolina we’ve had a
youth apprenticeship since about twenty thirteen in the
water industry water sector and we locally had a lot of
requests for manufacturers to have a pipeline of young people
coming into the workforce. So last year we started a pilot
program with high school seniors and we have two employer
sponsors BD and SKF in our five students that were selected are from Sumter and
cclaritin counties so they’re finishing up their senior year
of high school and taking classes either in mechatronics
a machine tool at central Carolina and then working at
that local company and earning a wage. So it’s a great
opportunity for them to get hands on experience while
getting the education and we plan to expand it. So next
year we want to look at other industry sectors have more
employer sponsors and more more students. Well that that’s great
to hear I know as a as a former high school student many years
ago. I wish I had that opportunity to earn as I learn
and accelerate that learning without a whole lot of debt so
that’s great. Which segways into something else I want to
talk about and that’s what is the biggest misconception about
getting a degree degree at a technical college. I think one
of the biggest misconceptions is that for some reason maybe
the quality of education isn’t as good and I couldn’t be
further from the truth our faculty
our credentialed on most of our programs either had this in our
state nationally accredited. We have nearly a hundred classes
that can transfer to a four year institution. So there’s a
lot of opportunity there on to get a quality education locally
and it can be you know a program that can help you go
immediately into the work force or to transfer into to a four
year institution. Well that’s great
and I know as a as we talked about debt
sometimes if you attend school you haven’t factored in the
strategies necessary so that you reduce debt coming out. That
can be an issue can you speak to the cost of attending a two
year institution. Sure two year institutions in South
Carolina are very affordable especially within the
technical college system at central Carolina about seventy
five percent of our students receive some form of need based
financial aid. Nearly all of our students receive lottery
tuition assistance which pays sixty to sixty five percent
tuition right off the top. It’s not income based you don’t
have to pay it back well. So it’s a great opportunity on a
lot of our students actually leave with no debt which is
remarkable and we have another program that started in twenty
fifteen we call it central Carolina scholars. Where high
school students that are graduating from any high school
in our four county service area can attend central Carolina for
two years tuition free. Which is significant when you
think about some of our students can save up to thirty
thousand dollars a year by taking their first two years at
central Carolina compared to going to a four year
institution. That is amazing and then at that same time getting
those skills ready to go into the work force even
as they try to continue on that trajectory to get a four year
degree you have something under your belt right. That’s
wonderful to hear Calvin we wanna learn about your journey
as you’ve gone and partnered with the Midlands fatherhood
coalition. So tell us about that journey and are earning your
first credential. It felt good because I never had
nobody help me growing up. A friend of mine put me on to him
and ever since I met him it was help to me. And I
like what you said you said you talk about not having someone
to help you growing up and a lot of times we become what we see
right and so I’d like to know how has I think you’ve gotten a
credentialing forklift. Yes ma’am. Now right. So how is that
helped you with dreaming of what your possibilities will be
for career. It’s telling me I can do anything I
set my mind to. I can get more out there than
this the simple things in life you know. And I try to do better
for my daughters. That’s wonderful to
hear because what you do when they see you doing will cause
them to want to do as well so that’s great. Im going to pivot
a little bit to mark mark would you tell us a little
bit more about the partnership that Calvin has been a part of
with the Midlands fatherhood coalition and how that is
supported him. Sure so the Midlands father coalition is one
of six programs located throughout the state and of
them their idea counties throughout the state and with
the work force piece and I’ll even kind of comment with
central Carolina one of things about technical schools as they
provide the continuing ed department. And so we
talked about the to your schools as Williams said that
but also those short term program. So Calvin participated
in the forklift which is what two day two day training and
leave with that credential which puts you a step above all
the folks that don’t have that. Their short term programs that
are couple weeks long and you know six months long and so
even for that person that you know didn’t doesn’t take that
traditional path there are still ways to to get some
training short term a lot of those classes are flexible and
made meet in the evening or or off time so that you can
continue to work. Those opportunities are out there and
so we’ve been trying to do more of that as an organization with
Midlands fatherhood and other father programs. Helping our
our staff are are the distance get jobs and opportunities but
also Hey what are some training we can do what are some things
we can do with the center Carolina or other technical
school to to give our participants a greater
advantage and and learn the skills that are needed that
manufacturing plant. Heard early about the the do skills that
are required well let’s let’s take take a couple of days a
couple weeks to get some of those skills and that’ll make
us look better when it when it comes to apply for those jobs
and and and longevity as well. So that’s part of our
process connecting our our participants with employment
but also with the training opportunities that available.
Right and and I like that it’s like the layering that you have
with other into entities other agencies and institutions
because you not only work with central Carolina but any
technical college or. Absolutely anything that’ll get our
participants an advantage and if you read articles about the
the shortage in in the state of with you know employers even
though we have a low unemployment rate. They’re still
certain jobs that are have low employment in those areas. I was
in Spartanburg a couple months ago and Spartanburg I believe
is that the medical school the the the hospital and they have
a partnership with Spartanburg community college and the guy
was saying man they will pay somebody that can do tile you
know thirty dollars an hour to
do tile work because it’s it’s a dying
art. It’s a field that they’re not getting a lot of people so
they’re actually have an increase the the payments and
also relax some of the standard so if you have something on
your record background doesn’t look great the that’s where you
know a lot of people a lot of companies are are being more
flexible to meet the needs of the state. That is great to hear
I tell you we’ve talked about students in their pathways and
how they can leave from high school to go into a two year
program or or certificate program or someone similar to
Calvin who has that nontraditional path. So I’m
going to come back to you Calvin right as I’m so
interested in your story what advice would you give to
someone who’s another Calvin sitting and just happens to
fall on this episode of Carolina classrooms. What would
you say that they could use to if they’re interested in
following your footsteps. Don’t be afraid to ask for help. And
have patience because you can’t get everything you
want right there. You know it
takes time. So patient and it will come.
That is wonderful to hear and what is your next step because I
know you got your forklift certification what’s the next
step. I have another class unit again this year for manufacturer
technician at USC. I mean CC central Carolina. And your
hopes and aspirations once you finish training. What
do you want to do. Experience new things. Just go
places and help build stuff. Wow that is wonderful to
hear so if there’s anyone out there that has a similar story
whether it’s nontraditional are coming through high school
whatever that pinpoint where that point is for you there are
options out there. I want to thank you all for sharing your
expertise and I just want to offer you this opportunity is
there anything if someone is interested what would you
share that information or how they could find you on if it’s
a father that’s looking for that support or someone that’s
willing to go in a technical college. So you can reach the
south Carolina center for
fathers and families we actually have
several ways online you go to father365.com or SCfathers&families.com also our our number eight oh three
two two seven eighty eight hundred and then we can point
you in the right direction and and get you to the right
service that we provide. I just recommend reach out to your local technical
college there sixteen in the state. So everyone is near near
technical college and and to speak with a career counselor
or an admissions counselor and learn about the programs
locally in and start there. Okay and if those students are
interested in a youth apprenticeship should they talk
to their high school. Either career counselors. Okay
wonderful wonderful. I want to thank you all for sharing of
your time and your your knowledge about what’s
going on and best basically your story Calvin. We appreciate
that and wish you well as you move forward okay. So we want to
thank each of the guests for participating in the panel
today. We know that our conversations today only begin
to scratch the surface about college and career readiness
and the state’s workforce needs. For more information about
workforce development and some of the state’s workforce
development goals you can visit SCETV.org\education
thank you for watching. ♪

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