Accessible Audiovisual Media

Accessible Audiovisual Media


The sound in a video, film or TV program
can present barriers for people with impaired hearing such as Susan or Lars. to illustrate this, how well can you follow what’s happening in this clip when we remove the sound like Susan or Lars you can understand much more when captions are provided Susan and Lars can get by with captions but some deaf people who know sign language may
prefer on-screen signing but this is not always readily available Captions or Subtitles for deaf and hard of hearing people as they’re called
in some countries provide text information on the screen that can show
people are saying, explain which character is speaking as well as
describing background noise such as a telephone ringing, dog barking or
children playing the picture in a video or TV program can
present barriers for people with impaired vision such as Carol or Maria.
How well can you follow what’s happening in this clip when we removed the picture. “hello”
“Hi, I’m really sorry, I bumped into a friend and I got talking” “I’ve been waiting 20 minutes, hurry up” “I’m on my way!” “Okay” “Hi, I’m so sorry” “don’t worry about it, you’re here now” Audio description, can help by providing some of the missing visual information
through speech. Description: Tamsyn is waiting for Anna outside the Theatre… She looks annoyed and checks her watch. She takes her phone out of her pocket and looks at it, it’s Anna calling. “Hello”
“I’m really sorry – I bumped into a friend and got talking” “I’ve been waiting 20 minutes hurry up”
“I’m on my way I promise I won’t be too long”
“Okay” Tamsyn puts the phone away fifteen minutes later… …Tamsyn is still waiting and is visibly annoyed. Anna finally arrives
“Hi, I’m so sorry”
” Don’t worry about it, you’re here now” They both start walking into the theatre. Here’s a quick run through of the barriers that can be overcome by using captions, subtitles, sign language,
audio descriptions and transcripts Captions are normally a two-line block
of text that is overlaid on the screen when people speak very fast the block of
text may disappear off the screen faster than you are able to read it and so
captioners often simplify rather than present every word. Captioners have time to
optimize block captions for recorded video but live TV verbatim captioning of
very fast speech, needs to be created using chorded phonetic keyboards whereas average speech rates can be captioned by
repeating and simplifying what is being said using speech recognition. Live
captions are harder to read than block captions because they scroll upwards and may
contain errors. Subtitles are a translation of a language spoken in the
video into a target language sign language is preferred by deaf viewers whose first language is sign language
and who find reading captions too difficult. Deaf people in different countries can
have their own sign language Transcripts can be static or interactive. Static
transcripts only provide the text transcription of the words that have
been spoken and so cannot convey which text corresponds with which image in a
video. An interactive transcript is not restricted to two lines as it is
presented next to the video and highlights the words as they are spoken. spoken description of important
information that would otherwise be only available
visually. Audio descriptions can only be inserted when no other speech or sound’s occur and so the short time available often means that only descriptions that
are absolutely essential to understanding can be provided. Web systems are available that can pause
the video to allow extra time for the audio description, for example – you
describe. We hope you have found this brief overview of captions, subtitles, sign language, transcripts and audio descriptions helpful.
Each country has their own regulations for captions or audio descriptions for both TV and
Internet and can vary in terms of the accuracy, number of hours types of broadcast and the times they
have shown. We look forward to your comments about your experiences of texts
or Sign Language captioning and audio description and the regulations in your
country

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